Ori Rotstein

MD, MSc

Director, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science

Biography

Dr. Ori Rotstein is the Director of the Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science. He is also a Professor and Associate Chair of the Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto, as well as the Surgeon-in-Chief at St. Michael’s Hospital. He is a practicing Trauma and General Surgeon with a research interest in understanding how traumatic injury leads to alterations in the immune response of patients such that these individuals are at high risk of developing organ injury and death. He uses these insights into the mechanisms of disease to generate novel therapeutic approaches to preventing poor outcome in these patients. His work spans the “bench to bedside” continuum, wherein he investigates cellular and animal models with a view to translating these to novel therapies in humans. This translational research has led to the investigation of the use of additives in resuscitation fluids in patients sustaining such injuries.

Dr. Rotstein is an acknowledged expert in the management of intraabdominal infection and inflammation. He is the former Director of the Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, the postgraduate arm of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto from 2001-2011 that was responsible for graduate training programs for more than 500 MSc/PhD students. In 2012, the Institute of Medical Science honoured him with an annual lecture ‘The Ori D. Rotstein Lectureship in Translational Research’. He is a member of several prestigious medical societies including the Society of University Surgeons, the American Surgical Association, and the American Society for Clinical Investigation. He is a Past President of the Surgical Infection Society and has contributed significantly to the activities of the American College of Surgeons through his participation on the Program Committee, Surgical Forum Committee, and the Scholarship Executive Committee.

Recent Publications

  1. Rattan, R, Allen, CJ, Sawyer, RG, Askari, R, Banton, KL, Coimbra, R et al.. Percutaneously drained intra-abdominal infections do not require longer duration of antimicrobial therapy. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2016; :. doi: 10.1097/TA.0000000000001019. PubMed PMID:26953758 .
  2. Rattan, R, Allen, CJ, Sawyer, RG, Askari, R, Banton, KL, Claridge, JA et al.. Patients with Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infection Presenting with Sepsis Do Not Require Longer Duration of Antimicrobial Therapy. J. Am. Coll. Surg. 2016;222 (4):440-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2015.12.050. PubMed PMID:26920994 .
  3. de Mestral, C, Hoch, JS, Laupacis, A, Wijeysundera, HC, Rotstein, OD, Alali, AS et al.. Early Cholecystectomy for Acute Cholecystitis Offers the Best Outcomes at the Least Cost: A Model-Based Cost-Utility Analysis. J. Am. Coll. Surg. 2016;222 (2):185-94. doi: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2015.10.015. PubMed PMID:26705901 .
  4. de Mestral, C, Rotstein, OD, Nathens, AB. Reply to: "Early Cholecystectomy for Acute Cholecystitis, How Early Should It Be?". Ann. Surg. 2016;263 (4):e59. doi: 10.1097/SLA.0000000000001206. PubMed PMID:26692075 .
  5. Rezende-Neto, JB, Angarita, FA, Rizoli, SB, Rotstein, OD. Modified triple-layer peritoneal-aponeurotic transposition: A new strategy to close the "open abdomen". J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2015;79 (4):694-7. doi: 10.1097/TA.0000000000000817. PubMed PMID:26402547 .
  6. Hui, S, Levy, AS, Slack, DL, Burnstein, MJ, Errett, L, Bonneau, D et al.. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Regulates Myogenic Responsiveness in Human Resistance Arteries. PLoS ONE. 2015;10 (9):e0138142. Epub 2015/9/14. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0138142. PubMed PMID:26367262 PubMed Central PMC4569583.
  7. Sawyer, RG, Claridge, JA, Nathens, AB, Rotstein, OD, Duane, TM, Evans, HL et al.. Trial of short-course antimicrobial therapy for intraabdominal infection. N. Engl. J. Med. 2015;372 (21):1996-2005. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1411162. PubMed PMID:25992746 PubMed Central PMC4469182.
  8. Tawadros, PS, Powers, KA, Ailenberg, M, Birch, SE, Marshall, JC, Szaszi, K et al.. Oxidative Stress Increases Surface Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression in Murine Macrophages Via Ceramide Generation. Shock. 2015;44 (2):157-65. doi: 10.1097/SHK.0000000000000392. PubMed PMID:25944793 .
  9. Ailenberg, M, Di Ciano-Oliveira, C, Szaszi, K, Dan, Q, Rozycki, M, Kapus, A et al.. Dynasore enhances the formation of mitochondrial antiviral signalling aggregates and endocytosis-independent NF-κB activation. Br. J. Pharmacol. 2015;172 (15):3748-63. doi: 10.1111/bph.13162. PubMed PMID:25850711 PubMed Central PMC4523333.
  10. Greig, PD, Rotstein, OD. Dr. Bernard Langer - inductee into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame. Can J Surg. 2015;58 (2):80-2. . PubMed PMID:25799243 PubMed Central PMC4373986.
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Affiliations & Other Activities

  • Scientist, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science of St. Michael’s Hospital
  • Surgeon-in-Chief, Department of Surgery, St. Michael’s Hospital
  • Professor, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto
  • Associate Chair, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto
  • Adjunct Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ryerson University